Monumental finds on Keros Dhaskalio

Exciting results from excavations carried out on the Greek island of Keros by archaeologists from Cambridge, Greece, and Cyprus: in the Early Bronze Age (the 3rd millennium BCE) the promontory (now an island) of Dhaskalio was almost entirely covered in monumental buildings made of imported marble. Not only that, but this ritual centre was also home to two sophisticated metalworking workshops and a drainage system. You can read the full report from the British School at Athens here.

 

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A CREWS-themed display at the Fitzwilliam Museum: installation day

For anyone who enjoyed the Codebreakers and Groundbreakers exhibition – or who’s still planning to go see it – here’s another ancient writing display at the Fitzwilliam Museum!

We have been dying to tell you all about a new display at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, focusing on some of the writing systems we are working on in the CREWS project. It started today (Tuesday 16th January) and will run until Sunday 10th June, which gives you plenty of time to come and see it! Here is the Fitzwilliam’s web page on the display: Writing in Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean.

The objects in the display are written in a number of different ancient writing systems, with Egyptian Hieroglyphic and Demotic, Babylonian and Ugaritic cuneiform, Cretan Hieroglyphic, Linear A, Cypro-Minoan, the Cypriot Syllabary, Phoenician and the Greek alphabet.

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Baking With CREWS – Ugaritic Tablet Biscuits

There’s been quite a lot of linguistics themed baking on this blog before, as well as from my colleagues at the CREWS project. We recently decided to expand into baking videos, so here just in time for Christmas is Philip from CREWS (with me behind the camera!) showing you how to make Ugaritic cuneiform speculoos:

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Watch this space for (hopefully) more ancient writing baking videos in future – maybe I’ll even be in front on the camera next time!

Καλά Χριστούγεννα/Happy Christmas!

I was at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research‘s Christmas party earlier today, and their Outreach officer Laure was getting people to say ‘Happy Christmas’ in as many different languages as we could manage between us for a Christmas video. So I contributed a written version: the Greek for ‘Happy Christmas’, kala Christougenna, written in both the Greek alphabet and Linear B.New Doc 2017-12-15

Continue reading “Καλά Χριστούγεννα/Happy Christmas!”

The Classics Christmas Charts — res gerendae

Term ended here in Cambridge at the beginning of December, so we’ve all been feeling Christmassy for a couple of weeks already. For anyone else who wants to get in the Christmas spirit, my graduate colleagues in the Faculty have been coming up with some classical Christmas songs – enjoy! (and do add your own suggestions in the comments!)

As term draws to an end, as Cambridge receives its first wintry snowfall of the year and as Christmas draws ever nearer, how do Cambridge Classics postgrads keep themselves occupied? Without our weekly dose of seminars, teaching and Faculty yoga, what keeps us ticking? The answer, it turns out, is a bit of festive fun: […]

via The Classics Christmas Charts — res gerendae

A spooky Halloween blog round-up

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Last year’s classical-themed pumpkin

This evening, when it’s dark outside, you’re alone in the house, and beginning to wonder just what it is that’s making the mysterious creaking noise somewhere above your head…well, that would be the perfect time to have a read of some Halloween-themed blog posts!

 

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More Codebreakers and Groundbreakers

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A follow-up to yesterday’s post on the Fitzwilliam Museum’s new exhibition to add some information on the related exhibition also running at the Museum of Classical Archaeology (in the Faculty of Classics). This is showcasing two aspects of the Faculty related to the Fitz’s exhibition: our collections of archival material relating to excavations by the archaeologist Alan Wace at the palace of Mycenae (which uncovered a set of Linear B tablets), and the range of current linguistic-related research taking place in the Faculty. This includes work on Linear B in the Mycenaean Epigraphy Group (which I’m a part of); the CREWS project on relationships between other ancient writing systems; the Greek in Italy project, whose name is pretty self-explanatory; and the team working on a new ancient Greek lexicon (dictionary) – a project that was started by John Chadwick, Michael Ventris’ collaborator in publishing the decipherment. Like the Fitz, it’s free to enter, plus you get to see the wonderful collection of casts of classical statues as well!

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