Arthur Evans’ Gardens

The British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans (1851-1941) is best known for his excavation and reconstruction of the Bronze Age palace of Knossos, on Crete (which I’ve posted about before), but also spent a considerable amount of his life in Oxford, where he was Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum (which now houses his archive as well as a considerable collection of finds from Knossos).

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Jarn Mound Wild Garden

Evans built a large house, called ‘Youlbury‘, on Boars Hill (just to the south-west of Oxford), which, sadly,  no longer exists (much of the former grounds is now a Scout Camp). One place that can still be visited in the area, though, is the Jarn Mound Wild Garden, created as a public garden by Evans (along with the Oxford Preservation Trust), and I thought I’d share a few pictures of a recent visit there. Continue reading “Arthur Evans’ Gardens”

Sicily: Culture and Conquest – review

2016-08-04 16.36.13Following my recent trip to the British Museum to see their exhibiton on Egyptian underwater archaeology, yesterday I had another trip to see their second current exhibition, ‘Sicily: Culture and Conquest‘. This focuses on two periods of Sicily’s history: the period of Greek and Phoenician settlement on the island (from around the 8th century BCE to the Roman conquest in the 3rd century) and the period of Norman rule in the 11th and 12th centuries CE. The exhibition’s premise is that these two ostensibly quite different periods both feature particularly creative interactions between the many different cultures which made up the population of Sicily, whether between Greeks, Phoenicians, and native inhabitants, or between Normans, Greeks, and Arabs. Continue reading “Sicily: Culture and Conquest – review”