Greek Myth Comix

I’ve just come across this fun blog illustrating the Iliad, the Odyssey, and Greek myths in comic form, and thought I would share it. Favourite post so far: the infographic with a statistical breakdown of all the deaths in the Iliad, because who doesn’t sometimes need a quick reference to how many people are killed by rocks in the whole poem (10) or the Top Three Grimmest Death? Though I’m pretty sure that last one is debatable, so feel free to make your own nominations…

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Fly through Ancient Rome…

…with this 3D recreation of central Rome in the late antique period. This project is apparently aiming to produce a whole series of models of Rome at different periods, from c.1000 B.C.E. – 550 C.E., so hopefully this will be the first in a long series of video tours of the Eternal City!

Classical Stuff on the Internet

I’m afraid this post is not going to be an in-depth analysis of the current use of the internet to facilitate Classical learning, or anything actually useful or relevant like that. In fact it’s really just two links to things I came across in the course of today that seem like a nice illustration of the principle that you can literally find anything on the internet (without, in this case, even trying particularly hard). First of all (courtesy of rogueclassicism) we have what must be the best piece of bureaucratic correspondence ever, in the form of two poems in medieval Latin style, dating from the good old days of the 1930s.

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Antiquity À-la-carte

My latest find of incredibly-useful-tools-I-wish-someone-had-told-me-about-earlier is “Antiquity À-la-carte“, an application developed by the Ancient World Mapping Centre which allows the user to create customised maps of any part of the classical world:

Antiquity 2
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ORBIS: Google Maps for the Roman Empire

I’m sure many of you have often felt frustrated at the inability of Google Maps to accurately represent journey times within the ancient Roman Empire. Happily, a new online resource has been created for just such a purpose.

ORBIS, the Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World, will calculate the fastest, shortest, or cheapest route between any two major cities across the empire, based on a range of factors such as time of year, whether you are a member of the military or merely a civilian, and your chosen mode(s) of transport (options range from “rapid military march” to “horse relay” by way of “ox cart”, “fully loaded mule”, “private travel (routine, vehicular)” and a host of others. It even tells you the price (in denarii) per kilogram of wheat transported via your chosen route. Continue reading “ORBIS: Google Maps for the Roman Empire”