New Faculty project: Greek in Italy

Just thought I should share a link to the Faculty’s new AHRC-funded project on ‘Greek in Italy’ for those of you who missed the launch last night – you can read all about the project’s aims and follow its progress on their blog, http://greekinitaly.wordpress.com/. There are already some interesting posts (with nice pictures) up, so take a look!

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The Odyssey by Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden

 

Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden

Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden are storytellers who perform a wide range of different stories, from folk and fairy tales via King Arthur, Beowulf, and Robin Hood to the IliadOdyssey, and Metamorphoses – for the last three of which they were awarded the 2006 Classical Association Prize for ‘most significant contribution to the public understanding of Classics’. Having seen their performance of the Iliad several years ago and been absolutely amazed by it, when I found out they would be doing the Odyssey in Cambridge I had to go along. Continue reading “The Odyssey by Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden”

Linguistics Baking Part V: Byblian Pseudo-Hieroglyphic

I admit that this one is obscure even by my usual standards, but then, what else is the Epigraphic Cake series for if not increasingly obscure undeciphered scripts? Allow me, therefore, to present the Byblian Pseudo-Hieroglyphic cake:

Byblian Pseudo-Hieroglyphic Cake

Continue reading “Linguistics Baking Part V: Byblian Pseudo-Hieroglyphic”

The Secret Anthropologist, Part II

Editor’s note: This report was recently found pinned to the notice-board in the Graduate Common Room. It appears to be written by the same person as the previous anthropological report, but their identity remains a mystery. It is evident, however, that their fieldwork project in the Faculty is still ongoing.

Following my initial study of the event known as “Graduate Tea“, I have since been fortunate enough to gain access to the Classicists’ second important weekly ritual, the “Graduate Interdisciplinary Seminar” (or “GIS”, as it is generally referred to by the initiated).

Continue reading “The Secret Anthropologist, Part II”

‘The Earith Jupiter’ arrives in Cambridge

The Arch & Anth Museum has a new Roman inhabitant!

University of Cambridge Museums

A Roman sculpture of the God Jupiter, dating from between the 2nd and 4th Century AD, has been donated to the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology by Hanson Aggregates. It was found by Cambridge Archaeological Unit whilst excavating Hanson’s Earith Quarry near Colne Fen in the Cambridgeshire District of Huntingdonshire between 1997 and 2007.

The sculpture is made from Upwell limestone from Norfolk, and originally formed part of a larger monument topped with a freestanding feline (lion, sphinx or griffin) – paws can be seen at the top of the cornice. The drilled eyes of the face would have once been filled with coloured paste to make the sculpture more lifelike.

Cambridge Archaeological Unit searched the area but did not find any other fragments of the original larger sculpture, suggesting that this section was taken to the area as a fragment. It is likely that it was re-used…

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Graduate Interdisciplinary Seminar – 29.11.2013

This week’s GIS was a special session for MPhils and 1st-year PhDs to give short presentations about their proposed thesis topics – because two subjects in an hour and a half just didn’t seem like enough, so why not have six? The talks ranged over Greek and Latin literature, archaeology, and linguistics, with some lively discussion and feedback following each one.  Continue reading “Graduate Interdisciplinary Seminar – 29.11.2013”

Consult the Oracle

MPhils – want to know how you’ll do on your first essay? PhDs – want to know when, if ever, your thesis will finally be finished? Desperate to know the definitive answer to the Homeric Question, or whether Linear A will ever be deciphered? Help is at hand! The UCL Oracle is available entirely free of charge to answer all your questions, any time of the day or night, with no need to queue! Of course, interpreting the answers is still up to you, so take care – remember Croesus

I thought I’d give it a test by asking if there was anyone wiser than Socrates. The answer:

OracleGuess I’m going to have to try harder next time…But what will the oracle predict for YOUR future? Inquire if you dare!