A Visit to Athens

P1020243 - CopyJust before Christmas I was lucky enough to go on a research trip to Greece, where I spent a happy couple of weeks in various museum workrooms. Naturally I also managed to get in some sightseeing around Athens (helped by the fact that Greek museums are only open for work until 3pm), so I thought I would share a few tips of things to do/see for any RG readers who may be visiting in future.

Obviously, the first four things to visit in Athens are the Acropolis, the Acropolis Museum, the Agora, and the National Archaeological Museum, but I’m pretty sure most readers of this blog would already be heading for those as soon as the plane touched down. So, assuming you’ve already been in Athens a couple of days and have seen all of those, here are my top suggestions of what to do next:
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AmnesTea Bake Sale

Past and present Graduate Tea representatives, with ALL THE CAKE
Past and present Graduate Tea representatives, with ALL THE CAKE

Three generations of Grad Tea representatives joined forces today (with a little help from our friends) for an AmnesTea bake sale – that is, selling cake (with tea) in aid of Amnesty International to grads, undergrads, and staff alike. Continue reading “AmnesTea Bake Sale”

Discovering Tutankhamun at the Ashmolean Museum

The Mask of Tutankhamun (image from Wikipedia)

Tucked away unobtrusively at the back of Oxford’s Sackler Library, the Griffith Institute of Egyptology is the home of the complete Howard Carter archives, documenting the discovery and ten-year excavation of the tomb of Tutankhamun. The Institute celebrates its 75th anniversary this year, and so the Ashmolean’s current exhibition, “Discovering Tutankhamun“, explores the excavation and its aftermath using material from the Griffith’s archives – so during my latest visit to The Other Place, I paid it a visit on Res Gerendae’s behalf.
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Greek Myth Comix

I’ve just come across this fun blog illustrating the Iliad, the Odyssey, and Greek myths in comic form, and thought I would share it. Favourite post so far: the infographic with a statistical breakdown of all the deaths in the Iliad, because who doesn’t sometimes need a quick reference to how many people are killed by rocks in the whole poem (10) or the Top Three Grimmest Death? Though I’m pretty sure that last one is debatable, so feel free to make your own nominations…

New discoveries at Binchester Roman Fort

You may already have seen the headlines about recent archaeological discoveries at Binchester Roman Fort, somewhat over-dramatically being referred to as the “Pompeii of the North” — e.g. this BBC news story. There’s a lot more information about the site and the dig on its website and its blog – for instance, the ring mentioned in the BBC story as being ‘one of the earliest pieces of evidence for Christianity in Britain’ is described in more detail here, and the whole blog is worth a scroll through for more details of the finds and some nice pictures.

 

Vikings: Life and Legend – Review

Vikings: Life and Legend

The British Museum’s first blockbuster exhibition in their new temporary exhibition gallery has been getting plenty of publicity, mostly about the arrival of the longest Viking longship ever discovered – or at least, the 20% of its wooden frame that survives, plus a reconstruction of the rest – from Denmark. A new gallery, a giant longship, and Vikings! How could a group of Classicists resist…?

 

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BSA Knossos Postgraduate Pottery Course

Pots from the Heraklion Museum. Quiz: name the period!
Pots in the Heraklion Museum. Quiz: name the period!

Last year our Res Gerendae correspondent reported on the British School at Athens’ Epigraphy Course; this year it was the turn of the BSA’s Pottery Course, based at their site in Knossos, to receive a visit from RG. After an introductory day in which the Curator, Matthew Haysom, introduced us to ‘Trends in Pottery Studies’ and also, even more importantly, showed us how to get to the supermarket, we started the course proper: essentially, the eleven of us had just under two weeks to cover almost four thousand years’ worth of pottery, from the Late Neolithic to the Late Roman period. Continue reading “BSA Knossos Postgraduate Pottery Course”