Travels in Crete

As the Cambridge winter starts drawing in, the natural response (at least as far as I’m concerned) is to start daydreaming about warm sunny places in the Mediterranean. Fortunately, one of the advantages of Classics is that it provides the perfect excuse to go to said warm sunny places and sit on a beach eating ice-cream benefit from the informative and educational experience of visiting Classical sites and museums. New graduate students may like to know that you can apply for Faculty funding not just for research trips (conferences, library/museum visits, etc) but also for travel to ‘Classical lands’ (i.e., pretty much anywhere the Greeks and/or Romans got to) that’s not directly connected with your research, especially if you haven’t had the opportunity to visit said Classical lands before (information and application forms are on the Classics Graduate Moodle, accessible by current students only via Raven).

In the tradition of Res Gerendae travel tips for students visiting Classical (or not-so-Classical) places, I offer a few  recommendations from my recent trip to Heraklion, Crete, to study some Linear B tablets in the Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Continue reading “Travels in Crete”

A Visit to Athens

P1020243 - CopyJust before Christmas I was lucky enough to go on a research trip to Greece, where I spent a happy couple of weeks in various museum workrooms. Naturally I also managed to get in some sightseeing around Athens (helped by the fact that Greek museums are only open for work until 3pm), so I thought I would share a few tips of things to do/see for any RG readers who may be visiting in future.

Obviously, the first four things to visit in Athens are the Acropolis, the Acropolis Museum, the Agora, and the National Archaeological Museum, but I’m pretty sure most readers of this blog would already be heading for those as soon as the plane touched down. So, assuming you’ve already been in Athens a couple of days and have seen all of those, here are my top suggestions of what to do next:
Continue reading “A Visit to Athens”

BSA Knossos Postgraduate Pottery Course

Pots from the Heraklion Museum. Quiz: name the period!
Pots in the Heraklion Museum. Quiz: name the period!

Last year our Res Gerendae correspondent reported on the British School at Athens’ Epigraphy Course; this year it was the turn of the BSA’s Pottery Course, based at their site in Knossos, to receive a visit from RG. After an introductory day in which the Curator, Matthew Haysom, introduced us to ‘Trends in Pottery Studies’ and also, even more importantly, showed us how to get to the supermarket, we started the course proper: essentially, the eleven of us had just under two weeks to cover almost four thousand years’ worth of pottery, from the Late Neolithic to the Late Roman period. Continue reading “BSA Knossos Postgraduate Pottery Course”