Barefaced Greek: Lysistrata

Another great video from the team behind the Cambridge Greek Play, whose new ‘Barefaced Greek‘ project is creating a series of short films with extracts from ancient Greek plays in the original language (with subtitles!). After doing the opening speech from a tragedy, Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, for their first film, now they’ve turned to comedy, with an extract from Aristophanes’ Lysistrata. The eponymous heroine explains to the men of Athens how she and the other women aren’t going to put up with the men fighting wars any more – or as Barefaced Greek’s description puts it, ‘why patriarchy is pants’. Enjoy!

Greek plays online

Last term I wrote a review of the fantastic Cambridge Greek play, a tragedy/comedy double bill of Antigone and Lysistrata: now the production team have made some video highlights of both plays available online. Have a look at the video below!

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The Cambridge Greek Play 2016: Antigone and Lysistrata

poster2016
Image from http://www.cambridgegreekplay.com

There’s a tradition in Cambridge of putting on a production of an Ancient Greek play every three years – entirely in Ancient Greek (with English surtitles!). Expectations were running high this year when, after a phenomenal tragedy-comedy double bill three years ago (Prometheus Bound and The Frogs), the same production team returned for another double bill: Antigone and Lysistrata – a tragedy about a woman who defies the laws of her city (and her uncle Kreon, the king) to bury her dead brother, and a comedy about a woman who organises a sex-strike to put an end to wars between the Greek city-states. When I say expectations were running high, I mean that at the time of writing tickets were entirely sold out, though there may be returns for the last couple of shows on October 14th and 15th (check the theatre site) – but I also mean that I personally was looking forward to another incredible performance – the ‘Prometheus’ last time round in particular was hands down the best production of any ancient Greek play I’ve ever seen, and I’ve seen quite a few. I’ve just got back after the show, and I can safely say I wasn’t disappointed – in fact I think this production may have been even better than the last one. Continue reading “The Cambridge Greek Play 2016: Antigone and Lysistrata”

The Cambridge Greek Play 2013: Prometheus & The Frogs

If you haven’t already been to the Cambridge Greek Play – a double bill of Prometheus and The Frogs – or bought tickets for today’s or tomorrow’s performance, then before you read this review – STOP, and book your tickets now, because everyone ought to go to see this!

Done that? OK, you can read on now.*

Continue reading “The Cambridge Greek Play 2013: Prometheus & The Frogs”