A CREWS-themed display at the Fitzwilliam Museum: installation day

For anyone who enjoyed the Codebreakers and Groundbreakers exhibition – or who’s still planning to go see it – here’s another ancient writing display at the Fitzwilliam Museum!

We have been dying to tell you all about a new display at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, focusing on some of the writing systems we are working on in the CREWS project. It started today (Tuesday 16th January) and will run until Sunday 10th June, which gives you plenty of time to come and see it! Here is the Fitzwilliam’s web page on the display: Writing in Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean.

The objects in the display are written in a number of different ancient writing systems, with Egyptian Hieroglyphic and Demotic, Babylonian and Ugaritic cuneiform, Cretan Hieroglyphic, Linear A, Cypro-Minoan, the Cypriot Syllabary, Phoenician and the Greek alphabet.

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More Codebreakers and Groundbreakers

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A follow-up to yesterday’s post on the Fitzwilliam Museum’s new exhibition to add some information on the related exhibition also running at the Museum of Classical Archaeology (in the Faculty of Classics). This is showcasing two aspects of the Faculty related to the Fitz’s exhibition: our collections of archival material relating to excavations by the archaeologist Alan Wace at the palace of Mycenae (which uncovered a set of Linear B tablets), and the range of current linguistic-related research taking place in the Faculty. This includes work on Linear B in the Mycenaean Epigraphy Group (which I’m a part of); the CREWS project on relationships between other ancient writing systems; the Greek in Italy project, whose name is pretty self-explanatory; and the team working on a new ancient Greek lexicon (dictionary) – a project that was started by John Chadwick, Michael Ventris’ collaborator in publishing the decipherment. Like the Fitz, it’s free to enter, plus you get to see the wonderful collection of casts of classical statues as well!

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Start of term news: board games, exhibitions, and playing with clay!

It’s the beginning of term here in Cambridge, so time for meeting new students, organising teaching for the term, and generally filling up the diary. It also seems like a good time to share various upcoming events that Cambridge-based readers may be interested in, plus a piece of board-game-related news!

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Me writing a cuneiform tablet.

On October 21st, the Cambridge Archaeological Unit is hosting a ‘Prehistory and Archaeology Day’ (10.30-4pm, 34 Storey’s Way). There’ll be plenty of different activities to try out, from rock-art-painting to pottery-making – and of course, there’ll be several researchers from Classics and Archaeology there to teach people to write on clay in ancient scripts like Linear B, cuneiform, and Egyptian hieroglyphs! The event is free and there’s no need to book, just drop in — more information here. Continue reading “Start of term news: board games, exhibitions, and playing with clay!”

Some start-of-term news

Just a quick post with a few things I wanted to share for the start of term! Firstly, a couple of posts over on the Cambridge Classics graduate blog, Res Gerendae: some handy tips for new PhD students (mostly just as relevant to students in other universities!), and an exciting exhibition that’s currently on in the Faculty’s Cast Gallery (but finishing on October 15th). By the way, I encourage any readers who haven’t checked out Res Gerendae yet to do so – it has a lot of great posts on a huge range of topics, and I’m sure there are many more interesting posts to come this term! (Any new Cambridge classics grads reading this – I also encourage you to sign up to write for RG – see my previous post on why this is a useful and fun thing to do!) Continue reading “Some start-of-term news”

Sicily: Culture and Conquest – review

2016-08-04 16.36.13Following my recent trip to the British Museum to see their exhibiton on Egyptian underwater archaeology, yesterday I had another trip to see their second current exhibition, ‘Sicily: Culture and Conquest‘. This focuses on two periods of Sicily’s history: the period of Greek and Phoenician settlement on the island (from around the 8th century BCE to the Roman conquest in the 3rd century) and the period of Norman rule in the 11th and 12th centuries CE. The exhibition’s premise is that these two ostensibly quite different periods both feature particularly creative interactions between the many different cultures which made up the population of Sicily, whether between Greeks, Phoenicians, and native inhabitants, or between Normans, Greeks, and Arabs. Continue reading “Sicily: Culture and Conquest – review”

The Labours of Herakles: Cast Gallery exhibition

Just thought I would put in a quick plug for the Cast Gallery’s current exhibtion, which launched on Friday: ‘The Labours of Herakles’ by New Zealand artist Marian Maguire. The exhibition is a series of interesting and beautifully-done etchings and lithographs depicting Herakles as a participant in the history of New Zealand – mostly focusing on the impact of colonisation, but also other events such as Gallipoli or the women’s suffrage movement. A personal favourite is the one entitled ‘Herakles Writes Home’, done as a Greek vase-painting showing Herakles the colonist in his cabin – the details of the illustration are wonderful, right down to the titles of the books on the shelf (ranging from a Greek/Maori dictionary to Mrs Beeton). But the whole series is well worth popping into the Cast Gallery for a look! (For readers not in Cambridge, you can also see them here, though the images are unfortunately rather small – these are works that really need to be seen in person to appreciate all the details!)

Discovering Tutankhamun at the Ashmolean Museum

The Mask of Tutankhamun (image from Wikipedia)

Tucked away unobtrusively at the back of Oxford’s Sackler Library, the Griffith Institute of Egyptology is the home of the complete Howard Carter archives, documenting the discovery and ten-year excavation of the tomb of Tutankhamun. The Institute celebrates its 75th anniversary this year, and so the Ashmolean’s current exhibition, “Discovering Tutankhamun“, explores the excavation and its aftermath using material from the Griffith’s archives – so during my latest visit to The Other Place, I paid it a visit on Res Gerendae’s behalf.
Continue reading “Discovering Tutankhamun at the Ashmolean Museum”