Barefaced Greek: Lysistrata

Another great video from the team behind the Cambridge Greek Play, whose new ‘Barefaced Greek‘ project is creating a series of short films with extracts from ancient Greek plays in the original language (with subtitles!). After doing the opening speech from a tragedy, Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, for their first film, now they’ve turned to comedy, with an extract from Aristophanes’ Lysistrata. The eponymous heroine explains to the men of Athens how she and the other women aren’t going to put up with the men fighting wars any more – or as Barefaced Greek’s description puts it, ‘why patriarchy is pants’. Enjoy!

Greek plays online

Last term I wrote a review of the fantastic Cambridge Greek play, a tragedy/comedy double bill of Antigone and Lysistrata: now the production team have made some video highlights of both plays available online. Have a look at the video below!

Continue reading “Greek plays online”

How To Tell If You’re In A Greek Tragedy

"Mask youngster Louvre S3044" by Marie-Lan Nguyen - Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mask_youngster_Louvre_S3044.jpg#/media/File:Mask_youngster_Louvre_S3044.jpgEver felt as though your life were actually a Greek tragedy? Inspired by The Toast’s “How To Tell What Novel You’re In“, Res Gerendae presents a handy guide to establishing whether this is the case. If one or more of the following apply to you, you may well be a tragic character, and are advised to consult a literary scholar immediately (there will be nothing they can do to stop the inexorable progress of your fate, but they may be able to get a conference paper out of it). Additional symptoms missing from this list may be reported in the comments. Continue reading “How To Tell If You’re In A Greek Tragedy”