The ‘oldest text of the Odyssey’?

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Image via BBC

There’s been a lot of media excitement in the last few days over the discovery of a clay tablet at the ancient Greek sanctuary of Olympia (home of the original Olympic Games), with 13 lines of the ‘Odyssey’ inscribed on it. It’s certainly a very nice find – unlike in the Late Bronze Age period that I study, inscriptions of any kind on clay tablets are unusual at this point (the 3rd century CE, when Greece was part of the Roman Empire) – though it’s fair to say that most of the excitement has been due to the Homeric text and particularly to the claim that this is the oldest text of any part of the Odyssey. As plenty of other Classicists have been quick to point out, this isn’t actually true – there are plenty of earlier texts of (parts of) the Odyssey, e.g. on papyri from Egypt, and the oldest known example is an inscription on a potsherd from Olbia, modern Ukraine, dating to the 5th century BCE. This is just a quick post to provide some helpful links for anyone wanting to know more about this find:

Here is the original press release from the Greek Ministry of Culture (in Greek).

Here is a blogpost by ‘The Philological Crocodile’ correcting some of the errors that have appeared in a lot of the media reports, and speculating that the inscription could be a votive offering by a rhapsode (a reciter of the Homeric poems).

Here is a very detailed blogpost by ‘Kiwi Hellenist’ with a transcription and annotated photograph, as well as lots more details and a round-up of some of the news stories.

Greek Myth Comix

I’ve just come across this fun blog illustrating the Iliad, the Odyssey, and Greek myths in comic form, and thought I would share it. Favourite post so far: the infographic with a statistical breakdown of all the deaths in the Iliad, because who doesn’t sometimes need a quick reference to how many people are killed by rocks in the whole poem (10) or the Top Three Grimmest Death? Though I’m pretty sure that last one is debatable, so feel free to make your own nominations…

The Odyssey by Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden

 

Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden

Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden are storytellers who perform a wide range of different stories, from folk and fairy tales via King Arthur, Beowulf, and Robin Hood to the IliadOdyssey, and Metamorphoses – for the last three of which they were awarded the 2006 Classical Association Prize for ‘most significant contribution to the public understanding of Classics’. Having seen their performance of the Iliad several years ago and been absolutely amazed by it, when I found out they would be doing the Odyssey in Cambridge I had to go along. Continue reading “The Odyssey by Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden”

Graduate Interdisciplinary Seminar – 29.11.2013

This week’s GIS was a special session for MPhils and 1st-year PhDs to give short presentations about their proposed thesis topics – because two subjects in an hour and a half just didn’t seem like enough, so why not have six? The talks ranged over Greek and Latin literature, archaeology, and linguistics, with some lively discussion and feedback following each one.  Continue reading “Graduate Interdisciplinary Seminar – 29.11.2013”

The Lost Books of the Odyssey

I’ve been meaning to write a review of this book for ages, since it’s not only one of my favourite Classics-based books, but also definitely has a place in my (long) list of favourite books ever – as the many of you to whom I’ve recommended it already know!

‘The Lost Books of the Odyssey’ is the literary debut of Zachary Mason, a computer scientist from California who wrote it in his spare time after work (don’t you just hate some people?). It’s a collection of forty-four stories, most of which are loosely constructed around episodes, characters and themes from the Odyssey (there are also a few based on the Iliad, and on other Greek myths) – the premise being that these are remnants of the epic tradition as it was before the canonisation of the Homeric versions of these stories. (The preface claims it to be a translation of a papyrus found at Oxyrhynchus, which ties in quite nicely with all our discussions last term about creating authority through ‘translation’.)

Continue reading “The Lost Books of the Odyssey”