More news on the Vindolanda writing tablets

I recently shared news of a newly-discovered writing tablet from the Roman fort of Vindolanda: now the excavation team have released a press release and it turns out they’ve found a whole cache of 25 tablets, all written in ink, some of which they’ve already been able to (partly) read. More information will have to wait until the tablets have been conserved and photographed, but for now here’s the press releasehere’s the press release (with some nice photographs!)

A new writing tablet from Vindolanda!

The Vindolanda Trust has tweeted this picture of a writing tablet found yesterday in the current excavations at the Roman fort:

The tablet looks beautifully well preserved – in the picture you can clearly see the indentation in the middle which would have held the wax for writing on (unlike most of the tablets found at Vindolanda, which were written in ink). We’ll presumably have to wait until the tablet is cleaned and conserved to find out whether there are any traces of writing preserved on the wood – which happens when the stylus went right through the wax and scratched the wood underneath – and whether they’re at all readable (as some of the stylus tablets found in London have been). Fingers crossed…

Roman baths discovered in Carlisle

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Archaeologist Kevin Mounsey holds a Roman water pipe (from the News & Star)

Some exciting news from the north of England – the remains of a Roman bathhouse have been found underneath a cricket pavilion in the city of Carlisle. The baths are thought to be associated with a nearby fort on Hadrian’s Wall. Here‘s the BBC report, and the local News & Star paper has more details and pictures here (including the one on the right, featuring the archaeologist in charge of the dig holding a rather nice Roman water pipe). Hopefully the site will be open to visitors in the future!

Londinium Calling

A very exciting announcement today of the publication of a group of writing tablets from Roman London, dating from the first century C.E. (i.e. the early period of Roman control of Britain). Features that have been reported include the earliest mention of ‘London’ (as ‘Londinio’ = ‘in Londinium’); the earliest dated handwritten document from Britain (January 8th, 57 C.E.); an example of someone practicing writing the alphabet; and contracts and legal documents providing all sorts of insights into the lives of people in Londinium. Continue reading “Londinium Calling”

Exciting News! A Roman Villa has been discovered in North Yorkshire.

Exciting news indeed. This may be old news to some readers since this was posted back in March, but I only just came across it. Click on ‘further information’ for a poster with plans and pictures šŸ™‚

See also: http://www.theadvertiserseries.co.uk/news/12967786._/

West Yorkshire Heritage Forum

TheĀ Bedale by-pass road construction project has revealed the site of an extensive Roman Villa which may well be the most significant to be found in Northern Britain.Ā  Preliminary evaluation work failed to establish the full extent of the villa and consequently a major part of the villa is under threat because the project has not included plans and funding to excavate and record all of what is clearly a very important site.

A Press Release has just been authorised and some of you may have seen a couple of minutes feature on BBC Look North on Tuesday 24th March 2015.

By clicking on theĀ links below you can read about what has been revealed so far.Ā  If you have a view as to what should be done next, use the Comment link on this page.Ā  I know this is happening in North and not West Yorkshire but this find is ofā€¦

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New discoveries at Binchester Roman Fort

You may already have seen the headlines about recent archaeological discoveries at Binchester Roman Fort, somewhat over-dramatically being referred to as the “Pompeii of the North” — e.g. this BBC news story. There’s a lot more information about the site and the dig on its websiteĀ and itsĀ blogĀ – for instance, the ring mentioned in the BBC story as being ‘one of the earliest pieces of evidence for Christianity in Britain’ is described in more detail here, and the whole blog is worth a scroll through for more details of the finds and some nice pictures.

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